Increase your impact: New practical research

Hello and welcome to our fortnightly update of all the latest articles on leadership and high-performance teams.

In this newsletter I’ve collected a range of articles focused on practical ways to increase your impact. There’s a range of easy-to-apply insights on speaking with more authority, better conference networking, and a surprising way to write more engaging presentations.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback – what is the most practical insight you took away from this edition?

Kind regards,
Gillian Fox

Vocal delivery: For better presentations, take command of your voice
Regardless of the presentation, your voice plays a key role in keeping the audience engaged. This is a great introduction to the four most important vocal skills. (SmartBlogs)

What to do with all the business cards from your last conference
Alexandra Samuel presents her strategy to transform conference connections to an ongoing business relationship. A good example of how powerful the right social media tools can be in professional networking.  (HBR)

For better presentations, start with a villain
For a more compelling presentation, Greg Stone recommends focusing on its three main actors: the villain, the victim, and the hero. The article includes plenty of practical examples across a variety of industries. (HBR)

Three military-tested techniques for improving your team’s decision-making
The U.S. Navy empowers individuals at all levels to make important decisions – including the wrong ones. (FastCompany)

The secret to sustaining high job performance
Every company is looking to get more done with less people – commonly leading to longer hours. In this NYTimes piece, Tony Schwartz explores why these longer hours aren’t translating to more output. (NY Times)

What high-potential young managers want
This research is the first to deeply examine the workplace behaviour of Generation-Y as leaders. The findings reveal very different attitudes toward leadership, organisational loyalty and job search. (MIT Sloan Review)


Want to get the best out of yourself and drive results through others? Take a look at our leadership programs.

The simple secret to employee engagement

Hello and welcome to our fortnightly update of all the latest articles on leadership and high-performance teams.

Want to know the simple secret to employee engagement? It’s all about rewarding your employees with more than just financial incentives. Employees want to feel their work is meaningful and making a difference. In this newsletter I’ve included few great articles that explore this topic in more depth.

How do you give your employees the opportunity to make a difference? I’m interested to hear your ideas, so please don’t hesitate to reply to this email.

Kind regards,
Gillian

Rethinking work
Employees need to be adequately compensated for their work, but they care about more than just money. Above all, they want meaningful work that makes a difference in some small way. (The New York Times)

Corporate social impact initiatives make employees more loyal
Having the opportunity to give back to society is a major incentive for top employees. It makes employees feel more loyal toward the company whilst also improving engagement levels at work. (INSEAD)

The research is clear: long hours backfire for people and for companies
Overwork hurts us and the companies we work for. Not only does it cause health problems, but it also leads to leads to diminishing returns as employees lose sight of the bigger picture. (Harvard Business Review)

Why self-managed teams are the future of business
This article argues that self-managed teams are time-tested, proven and here to stay. Broad adoption of self-managed teams won’t happen overnight, but here are some tips on how to make it work in your organisation. (INC)

How stressful work environments hurt worker’s health
New research finds that workplace stress is about as dangerous to one’s health as second-hand smoke. Employers should care because better health is associated with greater productivity, among other benefits. (The New York Times)

What do high performance teams look like?
Research shows that high performing teams yield significantly greater profitability (by a factor of 20% or more). Team expert Dr. Solange Charas discusses seven key characteristics that boost team performance and profit. (Talent Culture)


Want to get the best out of yourself and drive results through others? Take a look at our leadership programs.

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High performance teams | How to disagree | Leading with a growth mindset

Welcome to my weekly update of the most interesting news in the world of high accountability leadership.

We all know that high performing teams are central to achieving business results. This week, I’ve included a range of reads with interesting perspectives on how you can create teams that deliver results.

I’d love to hear what you’re reading this week. You can always get in contact with me by replying to this email.

Kindest Regards,
-Gillian

7 steps to building a high performing team
Hiring well just isn’t enough to build a high performing team. Building high performing teams requires deliberate attention into identifying key gaps and planning how to fill them.

Thought Leaders LLC

Winning tomorrow’s talent battle: What really matters
Leaders at top companies recognise that talent creates value that is essential to future success. Investment in high potential talent needs to be explained by a business case that is linked to financial performance.

Thinkers 50

4 steps to increase learning and growth
Our mindset impacts the way that we approach our work. A growth mindset means that we believe that intelligence and ability can be grown. Changing from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset can be difficult, but it will increase your performance and willingness to learn.

HR Daily

The diplomatic leader: How to agree to disagree
Healthy teams will always face disagreements. It is the only way to have effective conversations and achieve great outcomes. Some good tips on managing disagreements constructively.

HC Online

Organisational culture is shaped by the behaviours you reward
How the best leaders shape their company culture by aligning recognition practices with mission and objectives.

TLNT


Do your leaders deliver results consistently on-time and on-budget? Gillian Fox is an expert in leadership development to build accountability across your organisation.

Do your performance incentives drive good or bad behaviour?

Welcome to my weekly update of the most interesting news in the world of high accountability leadership.

I read a lot about performance management, and for good reason. Effective performance management leads to a more engaged workforce and better business results.

But it’s no secret that many leaders struggle to manage employee performance. We had some great news flow this week focused on some of the core issues, including:

  • Ensuring that your rewards strategy isn’t rewarding bad behaviours
  • Managing for behaviours that lead to results
  • The impact of using discretionary rewards as an incentive

How do you hold your leaders accountable to improving employee performance? I’d love to hear how you’ve made it work.

Kindest Regards,
Gillian

Do your company’s incentives reward bad behaviour?
Everyone knows that a good incentive structure can help you get the behaviours you want. But you also need to make sure that you’re not rewarding behaviours that you actually want to discourage.

HBR Blogs

The problem when managers get too fond of discretionary rewards
Discretionary rewards might not always be a good idea, writes Ann Bares. They can lead to confusion, as employees don’t know how their managers are assessing them. This leads to employees competing for a prize that is completely out of their control.

TLNT

Put the company’s interests ahead of your unit’s
Enterprise leaders are those who make decisions in the interest of the organisation as a whole. But recent research reveals that although companies value ‘whole-of-enterprise’ leaders, they aren’t interested in developing them.

HBR Blogs

Managing to results isn’t enough; focus on behaviours
Driving a results-based culture can cause managers to take part in unethical or illegal activities. But leaders who focus on managing the behaviours that lead to results are more likely to improve performance and achieve their goals.

Talent Management


Do your leaders deliver results consistently on-time and on-budget? Gillian Fox is an expert in leadership development to build accountability across your organisation.

 

 

 

Are you a leader for long-term growth or short-term profits?

Welcome to my weekly update of the most interesting news in the world of high accountability leadership.

This week we’re focused on accountability for both long-term results and short-term earnings.

Most of the time, meaningful results can only be achieved in the long term. But it’s all too easy for leaders to focus on boosting short-term profits rather than creating long-term value. In this context, research we’re featuring this week looks at some of the negative consequences of short-term stock incentives.

A lack of accountability to a long-term vision significantly damages long-term shareholder value. There’s a range of great reads that explain how we can refocus leadership towards long-term growth.

I’m interested to hear how you reward leaders that focus on the long-term. You can get in contact by replying directly to this email.

Kindest Regards,
Gillian

 

How CEOs became takers, not makers
Steve Denning explains that many CEOs are too focused on increasing their EPS. This can come at the expense of a sustainable long-term vision. Profits and share prices need to be refocused as the result, not the goal of a firm’s activities.

Forbes (part 1)

Forbes (part 2)

Profits without prosperity

Using stock-based incentives force executives to focus on short-term profits. But maximising shareholder value may come at a cost. Companies that don’t focus on sustainable long-term goals are unlikely to remain competitive.

Harvard Business Review

How to develop greater accountability

Leaders who are accountable to their results are crucial if a business is to prosper over the long-term. This article offers six helpful tips on how leaders can develop greater accountability.

Ready to Manage

Performance pay up, options down

Recent research indicates that companies are moving away from executive share plans as compensation. The trend is towards performance measures that are more closely aligned to a company’s long-term goals.

HR Online


Do your leaders deliver results consistently on-time and on-budget? Gillian Fox is an expert in leadership development to build accountability across your organisation.

Employee engagement and EPS

Welcome to my weekly update of the most interesting news in the world of high accountability leadership.

There was some great news flow this week on employee engagement. I see a lot written about the impact of engagement on employee satisfaction, motivation and creativity. But there’s also some great research here on the profit impact of a highly engaged workforce.

I do think engagement is a powerful framework – but only when leaders on the ground are thinking about it daily. Too often we think about engagement as just the once a year survey, beyond the control of individual managers.

Do you hold individual leaders accountable to engagement? I’d love to hear how you’ve made it work (If we get any great tips I’ll publish them in next week’s newsletter).

Kindest Regards,
Gillian

 

New leaders are often the least engaged
New leaders have a very direct impact on productivity, but they can’t engage others if they aren’t engaged themselves. Employers often fail to equip their leaders with the necessary support that they need to engage and motivate a team. This includes changes in attitude and approach as well as new knowledge and skills.

HR Daily

How engagement impacts EPS
Companies with a highly engaged workforce report 147% higher earnings per share than the competition. A nice piece on why engaging your employees with more than just money will lead to greater business results.

Huffington Post

The surprising benefits of manager/employee interactions
The median time that leaders spend interacting with their employees is only 3 hours per week. Achieving the optimal 6 hours will advance employee engagement, motivation and innovation. Middle managers and executives need at least 7 hours of direct support to achieve their highest levels of inspiration.

SmartBlogs

How you can motivate employees with just one word
A recent study found that the feeling of working in a team predicts greater intrinsic motivation. Just by saying the word “together” leaders can produce these effects. Participants in a recent study were 48% more productive when they felt “psychologically together”.

HBR Blogs

Star performers suffer more from a loss in status
When a high status person takes a tumble, their performance takes a bigger nosedive (than someone with lower status). This can negatively impact business results if a leader identifies too strongly with their status.

British Psychological Society


Do your leaders deliver results consistently on-time and on-budget? Gillian Fox is an expert in leadership development to build accountability across your organisation.